Category Archives: Uncategorized

My Blog has moved!

I’m now blogging from my own website and would love to have you join me there.

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As the Masses Become 300 Million Individuals Publishers Scramble

Social Media has turned the marketing world upside down in the past two years as the consumer evolves from “the mass” to the individual.  Some companies and brands have successfully navigated the shift while others, entire industries, have fallen behind and in fact seem surprised by the turn of events.  Publishing seems to be one of those industries that are just now scratching their heads and asking “What happened?”

Every person with computer access is now a writer and a publisher or has the ability to be so within 10 minutes of hatching the desire. Anyone can log onto the internet, start a free blog, open a Twitter account (where every 140 character thought they have is indexed and searchable by Google.com) and in effect, publish their thoughts.  Business slide presentations, nearly virtual business books, can be posted on LinkedIn and everyone with a glimmer of an idea can create an e-book and distribute it by tonight.

The era when gatekeepers carefully chose which  ideas would be presented to the consumer has passed.  The idea-makers are taking their work directly to the universe.  Less driven by the desire for monetary gain than by the need to express themselves and connect to others, these new world order writers are dumping endless content into the cybersphere.  Yet without the filter of publishing houses, editors, agents and the like, how does the end user find the work and commune with the writer?  Even if the reader finds the work, how can he/she be assured the work is good, interesting, valid.  

The aggregator sites are a start but lack the “taste filter” an editor might have provided.  Readers must self-select which writers they’ve liked in the past and hope they’ll enjoy future work.  Here’s where the community kicks in.  People who share a passion for a particular genre, writer or subject matter become the referral mechanism for those who are searching.  People are developing trusted communities and sources from whom they’ll accept recommendations much like we once trusted our local independent bookseller.  The hunger for information, the lust for a great read hasn’t died.  The medium, the delivery system and the discovery process, however, are changing.

So what does this mean for the future of books, fiction and non-fiction?  Publishers will continue to act as curators, finding and nurturing talent, but the financial model will have to change.  Increasingly the burden of finding an audience for a writer’s work will fall squarely back on the shoulders of the writer.  This is not always a good fit in terms of an writer’s skillset.

Mystery writers and women’s fiction/romance writers have an edge in this new world because publishers have always placed the lion’s share of the promotional responsibilities back on those genre authors.  They’ve become experts at self-promotion and understand the importance of building a passionate fan base and engaging with those fans.  They’re already social media pros. Business writers tend to be good at this as well.  But perhaps this appears so because publishers are only buying books from business writers who have already demonstrated their ability to build a database and a following for exactly this purpose.  The business model seems to be, “build it and we will publish.”

How, then, will first time novelists and self-help specialists with new ideas fare in the new Social order?  How will great work rise above the noise to capture the imaginations and heart of millions rather than just delight hundreds?  Will this democratizing of publishing rob us of literary talent who are not also self-marketers or will this process open the door to bright new talent who might never before have been able to squeeze by the gatekeepers?    I don’t know the answers and most likely neither do you but I’d love to hear your thoughts. Since we can’t look at things the same old way, we might as well talk boldly about what “new” can really be.

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Brand: Kathie Lee Gifford

Kathie Lee Gifford, Today Show co-host and author of a new book  Just When I Thought I’d Dropped My Last Egg: Life and Other Calamities (Ballentine Hardcover) http://budurl.com/ur65 was the guest speaker at the New York City Women’s Media Group luncheon Monday, May 18th.   

She had some very insightful thoughts on branding.  I suspect she doesn’t think of herself as a brand, but because my business is brand communications and marketing, I heard her talk through that filter and found that she exemplifies what I consider to be some of the most essential elements necessary for a strong brand: aspiration, inspiration and motivation.  I’d like to share a few quotes from her talk as illustration.

“You can have it all but not all at once.” This is Kathie Lee’s aspirational brand promise.  It tells her audience that she (and they) can live rich and fulfilling lives but there are some sacrifices which must be made along the way in terms of timing.  Kathie Lee shares stories of Broadway opportunities left behind when her children were very young and of new Broadway offers coming to her at a better time in her family life.  She talks about her decision to co-host the fourth hour of The Today Show, which some might view as a lesser spotlight than her position on Regis and Kathie Lee, but which was a very creative and rewarding new opportunity for her.  Her brand promise tells the consumer/viewer that Kathie Lee believes in going after your dreams, fully understanding and evaluating the personal “cost.”  Aspirational Brand promises resonate with the intended core audience and tell them that their aspirations are available to them – at some point in their lives.  This promise is spot on brand messaging for Kathie Lee’s intended audience.

“At my age, I’m delighted to be anywhere…”  Kathie Lee uses mild self mockery and humor as a way to identify with her core audience.  Here she tells her audience that she’s been through a lot in her life, as have they, and she understands their lives.   She also told the audience that she’s the oldest host on the Today Show other than Willard Scott.  An inspirational brand message tells the consumer that the brand is “just like her.” This brand understands that her audience is looking to her for inspiration and wants to know that even if it’s a struggle, success is possible – even later in life.

“My career is how I make my living.  It is not my whole life.”  This is Brand Kathie Lee’s Mission Statement and provides motivation for the viewer.  This gives her audience insight into what to expect from her.  She will talk about her husband and children.  She will make public appearance choices based on that mision.  She will moderate or alter her public life accordingly.  This motivational statement tells the viewer that by associating with Brand Kathie Lee, their lifestyle choices are not just validated but celebrated.  Her brand promises to provide information and entertainment which will always be guided by her Mission Statement.  They can trust and value her brand and “consume” it with confidence.  She motivates her audience to trust her and therefore, the information she presents to them.

Overall, Brand Kathie Lee’s core messages are clear and  she presents herself as sincere, funny, dedicated to family, creative and spiritual.  This says “I have a wonderful career but I have a life outside of work.  Family life is more important to me than my life in the public eye.” This brand promise tells her audience who she is and invites key emotional identifyers to join her.  She expertly positions her brand for clarity and her ideal audience can find her easily.

Which other celebrities do you think are managing their brand successfully?  Why? 


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Five Secrets to Creating Brand: You

When I was a kid my folks told me that I could be anything I really wanted to be.  Although not entirely true – I will never be 5’8″ – I have found that I have nearly unlimited possibilities.  I’m a writer, a marketing consultant, a wife and mother, a business woman, a coach, a loyal friend, a passionate seeker of new challenges and also someone who loves the quiet solitude of reading on a beach.  That abundance of choices and gifts can sometimes muddy the waters when I’m trying to define my “brand” to myself and to potential clients.  

I’m working hard to be very clear about who I am and what I do.  When I succeed in communicating this with clarity,  I’m happier and more productive and so are my clients.  I’ve looked to successful leaders to help me identify some “best in class” practices that are helping me define my brand.  I hope you’ll find them useful and inspiring as well.

For examples of people who have “done it right” while creating their own personal brand, look to the exploding world of social media.  These social media rockstars have perfected the art of personal branding and become  major social media players.  

On Twitter and throughout the web, Gary Vaynerchuk, @garyvee, Pete Cashmore, @mashable and Mari Smith, @marismith are instantly recognizable wherever they appear and there is no doubt in the viewer/consumer’s mind what their brand is all about.  

Why?  They all know these five secrets to creating their brands.

1.  Create a focused brand.  Gary Vaynercuk‘s earliest message on http://www.tv.winelibrary.com was “I taste wine and tell people about it.”  He began in 2006 and was in the forefront with his episodic  video blogging, combining his dynamic personality with video to demystify wine for the masses.  Pete Cashmore at http://www.Mashable.com began in 2005 focusing exclusively on web 2.0 and social networking news.  He succeeded in getting out in front of an industry that was about to explode and became a go-to resource for all things web and social.  Mari Smith, http://marismith.com, was dubbed the “Pied Piper of the Online World” by Fast Company and joined the fray in 2007, rapidly emerging as a relationship and social media marketing expert and teaching others how to jump onto this very fast moving train.  Each one of these leaders began with a very focused area of expertise.  Take time to decide what it is you want to share with the world.  Lesson: If you have more than one idea, focus on the one idea that excites you the most.  Creating a brand takes time, energy, and resources.  Put those precious commodoties to work on somethat that really jazzes you.

2.  Fill a need: Make sure there is a need in the world for what you offer.  People didn’t want to look foolish when ordering wine.  Everyone was talking about web 2.0 and very few people knew what that meant.  Social media and relationship marketing are hot, hot, hot and everyone is scambling to catch up and not be left out.  These three innovators filled  a need with their brand.  Lesson: Ask yourself if your idea fills a need, not just a desire, but a real need. 

3.  Engage in conversation:  You can be the most knowledgable brilliant person on earth in a specific area but  you’ll have trouble establishing your brand beachhead without engaging in conversation.  All three of our successful examples engage in extensive communications with the world through social media.  They blog, they teach, they speak in public, and appear at conferences and on television and radio.  But they began their rise by having intimate, informative, personal conversations with people who wanted to know what they know–people who shared their primary passion.  Those conversations took place on Twitter, Facebook, websites and via e-mail to name a few.  Lesson:  Join the conversation.  Get on Facebook.  Join Twitter.  Talk, follow, friend, listen and participate.

4. Build a following through service:  All that conversation is wonderful but wouldn’t have led to the leadership status that each one is now enjoying IF they had not provided real service.  The conversations that Gary, Pete and Mari are having with their followers is successful because each one provide service while sharing their knowledge.  They offer something useful, desirable and valuable and deliver it through “conversation.”  Lesson: Be of service to people who “give” you their time and trust.

5.  Evolve, engage and extend.  To rise to the top in your field, you need to become a leader.  Participate fully in the community in which you are, or want to be, and expert.  For example, in marketing and social media, the landscape changes rapidly.  This means that to be a leader, you must be fully engaged in social media avenues to keep your clients abreast of what’s new. In a very short time Facebook eclipsed MySpace, Twitter exploded and made blogging into microblogging and YouTube is changing television viewing habits.  Your brand will need to adjust to new developments, evolve and grow in response to consumer needs, engage with your peers and fan base to keep current with their needs and extend your brand to become a thought leader in your field. 

The next *great idea* could come from your brand.  Have fun creating Brand You!

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